How to Build Your Personal Brand as a Writer

I know, I know. The writer is usually antisocial, asocial, or just shy, and the idea of building a brand is something that only those extroverts take pleasure in doing.

Well, tell you what: in today’s marketplace, if you do not have a brand, you do not exist.

So, what can you do to build an online brand as a writer?

Continue reading How to Build Your Personal Brand as a Writer

Art and The Internet

net-art

I believe that right now there are more artists on this Planet, more writers choosing to self-publish or just posting their stories on blogs, more painters selling prints and original artwork on deviantart, etsy, and the likes, more sculptors, more singers and aspiring movie makers trying to get more subscribers on YouTube than ever before.

And I believe this is a good thing. Modern day technology allows us to achieve our most secret of yearnings: to share our art with the world. Maybe you’re reading this post and you’re telling yourself that you don’t make art for that. You create art just for yourself. But for that to be true, you’d never want anyone to read your stories. You’d be the only one who knows you’re a writer or painter or singer. Continue reading Art and The Internet

Almost…

“Art is never finished, only abandoned.” Leonardo da Vinci

Lately I’ve been considering the fact that I should/could edit all my previous releases. Lucky me, I’ve got plenty of other projects to keep me busy, so I can postpone this idea and overthink it until it becomes terrible.

But, if I were to read my books again, years after I last did that, I know that I’d feel compelled to change a lot of things. First of all, my style has changed quite a bit. And the way I understand fiction, the written word, the way said words form sentences. Or, better said, the way I prefer them to form sentences.

So the following question arises: is art ever finished? Continue reading Almost…

A Brief History of The Book (in Seven Pictures)

The Book: A Cover-to-Cover Exploration of the Most Powerful Object of Our Time from author Keith Houston explores the history of the book, from the Bible up through illuminated manuscripts, early book-binding, the printing press and beyond.

From parchment and papyrus to paper, from calligraphy to typesetting, enjoy some of the most striking images from Houston’s work, showing how the physical presentation of a large grouping of words has evolved over time. Continue reading A Brief History of The Book (in Seven Pictures)

Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

In 1940, John Steinbeck was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his novel, The Grapes of Wrath. In 1962 he was also awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. The same year he wrote a letter to actor and fellow writer Robert Wallsten, in which he offered six tips on writing. Continue reading Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

TMM: alter ego

alter ego: 

a second self or different version of oneself, such as
a :a trusted friend
b :the opposite side of a personality –  Clark Kent and his alter ego Superman
c: a fictional character that is the author’s alter ego

Literature is the lie that tells the truth. Or so they say. That’s why sometimes writers choose to use alter egos. Ernest Hemingway wrote the so-called Nick Adams stories, John Updike had Rabbit Angstrom and Henry Bech, Bukowski had Henry Chinaski.

But why? Continue reading TMM: alter ego