You Are What You Read

The brain is a super-computer. A wonderful circuit board that manages to interpret what we call reality. And words are the only way this super-computer can be programmed. There’s no such thing as someone who doesn’t read. Of course, there are folks who don’t read books, who only read Facebook Status Updates and memes and news.

How would that influence your brain? Continue reading You Are What You Read

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Why Frank Herbert’s “Dune” Is So Difficult to Adapt into a Movie

This could easily be a one sentence post.

Because it’s Frank Herbert’s Dune.

But, well, let’s elaborate on that. Continue reading Why Frank Herbert’s “Dune” Is So Difficult to Adapt into a Movie

Avant-garde

The avant-garde (/ˌævɒ̃ˈɡɑːrd/); from French, “advance guard” or “vanguard”, literally “fore-guard”) are people or works that are experimental, radical, or unorthodox with respect to art, culture, or society. It may be characterized by nontraditional, aesthetic innovation and initial unacceptability, and it may offer a critique of the relationship between producer and consumer.

Let’s simply define avant-garde as anything different from what’s conventional, because if it were defined similarly to the way the military does it, then after Tristan Tzara every single poet should have started using bits and pieces of newspapers to write their masterpieces. Museums would only showcase dadaism and surrealism.

Continue reading Avant-garde

Movie Review: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

Perry: Talking money…
Harry: A talking monkey?
Perry: Talking monkey, yeah, yeah. Came here from the future, ugly sucker, only says “ficus.”

Even though he had his fair share of problems, including a nasty drug addiction, Robert Downey, Jr. – a very controversial actor – succeeded to overcome it all and make a great comeback by playing in low budget movies such as A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints or Good Night, and Good Luck. Movies in which his performance was top notch. Continue reading Movie Review: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

In 1940, John Steinbeck was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his novel, The Grapes of Wrath. In 1962 he was also awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. The same year he wrote a letter to actor and fellow writer Robert Wallsten, in which he offered six tips on writing. Continue reading Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

Famous Writers and Their Addictions

“Coleridge was a drug addict. Poe was an alcoholic. Marlowe was killed by a man whom he was treacherously trying to stab. Pope took money to keep a woman’s name out of a satire, then wrote a piece so that she could still be recognized, anyhow. Chatterton killed himself. Byron was accused of incest. Do you still want to be a writer -and if so, why?” – Bennett Cerf

Some of the world’s most famous writers have been addicts, abusing almost anything, from coffee and alcohol to sex and drugs. They often wrote about their addictions, about the way the human conditions is degraded by them.

Here’s a short list of famous writers and their vices: Continue reading Famous Writers and Their Addictions

Showcase: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was a French painter, printmaker, draughtsman, caricaturist, and illustrator whose immersion in the colourful and theatrical life of Paris in the late 19th century allowed him to produce a collection of enticing, elegant, and provocative images of the modern, sometimes decadent, affairs of those times.