Showcase: Lucian Freud

The grandson of Sigmund Freud, Lucian Michael Freud was one of the foremost portraitists of the 20th century. Continue reading “Showcase: Lucian Freud”

Showcase: Jan van Eyck

Man in the Red Turban, thought to be a self-portrait

“I do as I can.” – inscription on the frame of Man in the Red Turban

As one of the early innovators of what became known as Early Netherlandish painting, and one of the most significant representatives of Early Northern Renaissance art, Jan van Eyck was already a master painter with assistants by the age of 32.

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Showcase: Francis Bacon

“OK, I got Velazquez portrait of the Pope Innocent X. Quite an ambivalent study of absolute power. And here comes Francis Bacon. Despite never having seen this painting in person, Bacon became so obsessed with it that he compulsively repainted it over and over again, each version more horrific than the previous. […] It’s not until an artist finds his obsession that he can create his most inspired work.”Anamorph

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Showcase: Titian

Tiziano Vecellio was an Italian painter, the most important member of the 16th-century Venetian school. During his lifetime he was often called da Cadore, taken from the place of his birth.

Recognized by his contemporaries as “The Sun Amidst Small Stars” (recalling the famous final line of Dante’s Paradiso), Titian was one of the most versatile of Italian painters, equally adept with portraits, landscape backgrounds, and mythological and religious subjects. His career was successful from the start, and he became sought after by patrons, initially from Venice and its possessions, then joined by the north Italian princes, and finally the Habsburgs and papacy. Continue reading “Showcase: Titian”

Showcase: Alberto Giacometti

Alberto Giacometti, one of the most important sculptors of the 20th century, was influenced by artistic styles such as Cubism and Surrealism. Philosophical questions about the human condition, as well as existential and phenomenological debates played a significant role in his work. Around 1935 he gave up on his Surrealistic influences in order to pursue a more deepened analysis of figurative compositions. Giacometti wrote texts for periodicals and exhibition catalogs and recorded his thoughts and memories in notebooks and diaries. His self-critical nature led to great doubts about his work and his ability to do justice to his own artistic ideas but acted as a great motivating force. Continue reading “Showcase: Alberto Giacometti”