5 Lost Books that Could Have Changed The World

Ever since we first invented the written language and decided to try and document our experiences and pass down knowledge, there has also been the risk of losing certain books. Paper does burn, which is a tragic statement given the context.

Of course, we will never know about all the great books that have been lost during the ages, but we do have some clues as to what some of them contained.

Here are five lost books that could have changed the world.

Continue reading 5 Lost Books that Could Have Changed The World

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Books on Writing

Oscar Wilde once said, “Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.”

Writing as an art can’t be taught, and even though Creative Writing courses and workshops undoubtedly help writers grow, writing is a solitary process, and it’s up to each individual to reach within the confines of his mind for answers. Continue reading Books on Writing

TMM: The Die Has Been Cast

“In everybody’s life there’s a point of no return. And in a very few cases, a point where you can’t go forward anymore. And when we reach that point, all we can do is quietly accept the fact. That’s how we survive.”Haruki Murakami

I don’t know what artists are made of, but it isn’t happiness. Perhaps it’s fear; to be so afraid of the world that you do nothing but observe. You turn yourself into a quiet shadow. You interpret the world, you give it a new meaning every day.

But I don’t think that’s the point… of art, of life.

The point is to change the world.

And maybe it’s ironic, that the ones the world almost breaks are the ones who do everything they can to change it. Continue reading TMM: The Die Has Been Cast

TMM: Words

“Words can create love or hate, tears or smiles, harmony or chaos, war or peace. Choose your words with care.” A.D. Williams

The truth is, words are meager things. I know this, because words are my profession. Words are what my soul is made of. And I know that sometimes words fail to express certain depths of the human soul.

When words fail, tears fall. When words fail, the world’s beauty is no longer enough to make us feel alive. Words can hurt, yes, but the most harm they ever do is when you choke before you utter a single word. Continue reading TMM: Words

A Step-By-Step Guide to Writing a Novel

How do you write a novel? It’s all about taking a few steps…

Thinking about writing a novel? Don’t know where to start? How? When? Well, to paraphrase Ernest Hemingway, writing is not that hard… all you have to do is take a seat at a desk and bleed your soul out through your fingers.

Yeah, I’m just being dramatic right now. Writing a novel is all about that first step. To feel this burning desire to write, and to listen to it, and to never hold back. Writing that novel is not something you will get to one day. It is something you have to do.

Here are some “steps” on how to write a novel. Please keep in mind that we’re all different, and every great writer has their own process. These should be used as a guideline to help develop your own.

Continue reading A Step-By-Step Guide to Writing a Novel

TMM: Words and Ideas

No matter what happens in my life, there’s one thing I believe in with all my heart: words can shape the world. I believe in the right words said at the right time, I believe in reading someone’s words and deciding a different outcome for yourself.
That’s one of the reasons I write. That maybe once in a while my words offer someone comfort or hope or inspire them to strive for more. I write for someone half a world away to feel less lonely in their thoughts and feelings. Continue reading TMM: Words and Ideas

Book Review: The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Other Stories by Carson McCullers

From Amazon.com:

A classic work that has charmed generations of readers, this collection assembles Carson McCullers’s best stories, including her beloved novella “The Ballad of the Sad Café.” A haunting tale of a human triangle that culminates in an astonishing brawl, the novella introduces readers to Miss Amelia, a formidable southern woman whose café serves as the town’s gathering place. Among other fine works, the collection also includes “Wunderkind,” McCullers’s first published story written when she was only seventeen about a musical prodigy who suddenly realizes she will not go on to become a great pianist. Newly reset and available for the first time in a handsome trade paperback edition, The Ballad of the Sad Café is a brilliant study of love and longing from one of the South’s finest writers.

There’s something about these stories that makes you empathise with the human condition; we are who we are when we can help it, when there’s nothing else to be but ourselves.

We are who we are because someone has to be.

The characters that inhabit these little stories are what one would define as misfits, rebels. But that’s the magic of stories: we realize that we are all made of the same stuff. We are all human. We are all the same. Different, but the same. At the same time. The paradox of human nature.

What I am trying to say is that these misfits feel the same emotions as we do, and they teach us so much about ourselves, our own fights and defeats, and also make us realize that oftentimes what sets us apart must also make us feel lonely/live a life of solitude.

A must-read, The Ballad of the Sad Café contains stories about other people, stories about the kind of people that we might never encounter in real life, but those stories teach us so much about ourselves.