10 Movies That Were Better Than The Book

“Having your book turned into a movie is like seeing your oxen turned into bouillon cubes.” – John Le Carré

A lot of writers sell the rights to their books to producers who seem to have nothing but the best intentions for their works. Unfortunately, most often than not, the end result is nothing but disappointing.

Indeed, on rare occasions, the opposite is true: the adaptation improves greatly the source material. Here are 10 movies that are better than the book they were based upon.

Continue reading “10 Movies That Were Better Than The Book”

TMM: Burning Out

So, how long can you keep this up? The grind.

How long before you burn out?

Well… the thing is, this whole grind thing… it’s only meant to put you in a certain state of mind, which is everything when it comes to doing pretty much anything in life.

And the state of mind that comes with the idea of hard work, of having to fight to get what you want, doesn’t allow you to act all lazy and Netflix and chill your way through life.

But it is more important to work smart.

Continue reading “TMM: Burning Out”

The Reader

Whenever I tell someone I’m a writer, and they show genuine interest towards my “profession,” I end up telling them about all the cool e-mails I get from people. Or about the reviews my books get. Or this or that comment.

You know, there are good days and bad days. There are days when you don’t feel like writing, or days that you simply don’t want to write. But your readers are what’s most important, what keeps you going, what makes you feel like a writer even during those bad days. Continue reading “The Reader”

Self-Portrait

Imagine drawing a map. Imagine tracing all these lines and shapes, using different colors. Quite a meticulous process. But this map is not one that leads to a treasure, or one that is meant to describe any real place on earth. No. This is a map of your soul. Depression Valley, Island of Solitude… you get the idea. All the places that are scarred because of too many tears. The heartbreaks, the bitterness, the loneliness, the happiness, the joy… the ecstasy.

All an artist does is a self-portrait. Everything. We write about people we never met, and we like to think that we simply imagined them into existence, but the truth is that our characters either resemble us or have traits and qualities we wish we had. 

Continue reading “Self-Portrait”

Art You Lost?

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Feeling down? Sad? Lost? Angry? So, so tired?

Why not art?

Why not art yourself back to happiness?

“No one has ever written, painted, sculpted, modeled, built, or invented except literally to get out of hell.” – Antonin Artaud

All art is rather useless, don’t you think? It has no survival value. It does not feed the hungry, it does not clothe the naked, it does not keep us warm…

But does it add value to our survival? Continue reading “Art You Lost?”

The Goal

“We all die. The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will.”  – Chuck Palahniuk

Sometimes, when I’m alone, I ask myself all sorts of questions. Am I building something now? Am I the person I’ve always wanted to be? If not, am I becoming that person or did I get lost on the way? Are my dreams coming true? You know, the type of questions one does not like to ask. But I keep asking them, I keep trying to find answers.

I’d like to believe that my stories are going to last for a long, long time. Maybe for as long as the human race itself. But what can you do about this? How can you build a legacy? How can you make sure that people will remember you? Continue reading “The Goal”

Metafiction

“We’re all searching for something in our art. There are questions, and we always feel close to finding the answers, but we never do.

Artists never create art for what they might find. Some want to free themselves from nightmares, others want to inspire, or raise questions, or make people understand the world around them. Some want to entertain, others want to get rich, but it seems to me that no matter our reason for choosing to become artists, we all find more happiness in the stories or paintings or songs we create than we find in the real world. This is the sad truth: artists choose to live with one eye always closed to the world, the here and the now, and use that awareness to see what others can’t.

Inside the artist’s soul there is always a part that feels no remorse or fear when it comes to all that is dark in human nature. It seems to me that a part of the artist’s soul gets damaged to such an extent that it grows impervious to pain, heat, or cold. Like a scar.” Continue reading “Metafiction”

Book Review: The Last Tycoon by F. Scott Fitzgerald

From the book’s description:

Unfinished at the time of his death, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Last Tycoon is a story of doomed love set against the extravagance of America’s booming film industry. The studio lot looks like ‘thirty acres of fairyland’ the night that a mysterious woman stands and smiles at Monroe Stahr, the last of the great Hollywood princes. Enchanted by one another, they begin a passionate but hopeless love affair, starting with a fast-moving seduction as slick as a scene from one of Stahr’s pictures. The romance unfolds, frame by frame, watched by Cecilia, a thoroughly modern girl who has taken her lessons in sentiment and cynicism from all the movies she has seen. Her buoyant humor and satirical eye perfectly complement Fitzgerald’s panorama of Hollywood at its most lavish and bewitching.

If the great Francis Scott Fitzgerald would have finished writing this novel, it would have been his masterpiece. Yes, it would have been better than The Great Gatsby, which is my favorite novel of all time, and the only piece of writing I’ve been reading once a year since I was seventeen. Besides Dune. Continue reading “Book Review: The Last Tycoon by F. Scott Fitzgerald”