Showcase: Peter Paul Rubens

Peter Paul Rubens. Considered the most influential artist of Flemish Baroque tradition. His highly charged compositions reference erudite aspects of classical and Christian history. His unique and immensely popular Baroque style emphasized movement, color, and sensuality, which followed the immediate, dramatic artistic style promoted in the Counter-Reformation. Rubens specialized in making altarpieces, portraits, landscapes, and history paintings of mythological and allegorical subjects. Continue reading Showcase: Peter Paul Rubens

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Showcase: Thomas Saliot

Born in 1968, Thomas Saliot has a certain style. He says it’s kind of like a blog. He uses pictures he finds on the web, snapshots of this century.  Continue reading Showcase: Thomas Saliot

Showcase: Paul Gauguin

Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin was a French post-Impressionist artist. He quit his job at a bank in order to paint. He did not manage to gain the appreciation his works deserved, even though his style was innovative in terms of the colors used and quite the departure from Impressionism.  Continue reading Showcase: Paul Gauguin

Showcase: Francis Picabia

Francis-Marie Martinez de Picabia. French avant-garde painter, poet and typographist. Experimented with Impressionism, Pointillism, and Cubism. His abstract works were colourful and rich in contrasts. He was one of the early major figures of the Dada movement in the United States and in France. He was later briefly associated with Surrealism, but would soon turn his back on the art establishment. Continue reading Showcase: Francis Picabia

Showcase: Edvard Munch

Norwegian painter Edvard Munch’s works can cause psychological trauma. Or are they depictions of such trauma? There’s something bizarre about them, and said works show how art is not about the outward appearance of things, but their inner complexities. What hides behind a smile? What can you figure out about a person from their body language? What is it about colors? Continue reading Showcase: Edvard Munch

Showcase: Alberto Giacometti

Alberto Giacometti, one of the most important sculptors of the 20th century, was influenced by artistic styles such as Cubism and Surrealism. Philosophical questions about the human condition, as well as existential and phenomenological debates played a significant role in his work. Around 1935 he gave up on his Surrealistic influences in order to pursue a more deepened analysis of figurative compositions. Giacometti wrote texts for periodicals and exhibition catalogs and recorded his thoughts and memories in notebooks and diaries. His self-critical nature led to great doubts about his work and his ability to do justice to his own artistic ideas but acted as a great motivating force. Continue reading Showcase: Alberto Giacometti

Showcase: Jean-Michel Basquiat

As part of SAMO, an informal graffiti duo who wrote enigmatic epigrams in the cultural hotbed of the Lower East Side of Manhattan during the late 1970s where the hip hop, post-punk, and street art movements had coalesced, Jean-Michel Basquiat managed to get the attention of many of the days artists, including Andy Warhol. His mixed art made use of poetry, drawing, and painting.  Continue reading Showcase: Jean-Michel Basquiat