You Are What You Read

The brain is a super-computer. A wonderful circuit board that manages to interpret what we call reality. And words are the only way this super-computer can be programmed. There’s no such thing as someone who doesn’t read. Of course, there are folks who don’t read books, who only read Facebook Status Updates and memes and news.

How would that influence your brain? Continue reading You Are What You Read

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Why Frank Herbert’s “Dune” Is So Difficult to Adapt into a Movie

This could easily be a one sentence post.

Because it’s Frank Herbert’s Dune.

But, well, let’s elaborate on that. Continue reading Why Frank Herbert’s “Dune” Is So Difficult to Adapt into a Movie

Avant-garde

The avant-garde (/ˌævɒ̃ˈɡɑːrd/); from French, “advance guard” or “vanguard”, literally “fore-guard”) are people or works that are experimental, radical, or unorthodox with respect to art, culture, or society. It may be characterized by nontraditional, aesthetic innovation and initial unacceptability, and it may offer a critique of the relationship between producer and consumer.

Let’s simply define avant-garde as anything different from what’s conventional, because if it were defined similarly to the way the military does it, then after Tristan Tzara every single poet should have started using bits and pieces of newspapers to write their masterpieces. Museums would only showcase dadaism and surrealism.

Continue reading Avant-garde

Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

In 1940, John Steinbeck was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his novel, The Grapes of Wrath. In 1962 he was also awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. The same year he wrote a letter to actor and fellow writer Robert Wallsten, in which he offered six tips on writing. Continue reading Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

Showcase: El Greco

Doménikos Theotokópoulos, most widely known as El Greco (“The Greek”), was a painter, sculptor and architect of the Spanish Renaissance.

El Greco’s dramatic and expressionistic style was met with puzzlement by his contemporaries but found appreciation in the 20th century. El Greco is regarded as a precursor of both Expressionism and Cubism, while his personality and works were a source of inspiration for poets and writers such as Rainer Maria Rilke and Nikos Kazantzakis. El Greco has been characterized by modern scholars as an artist so individual that he belongs to no conventional school. He is best known for tortuously elongated figures and often fantastic or phantasmagorical pigmentation, marrying Byzantine traditions with those of Western painting.

Continue reading Showcase: El Greco

Showcase: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was a French painter, printmaker, draughtsman, caricaturist, and illustrator whose immersion in the colourful and theatrical life of Paris in the late 19th century allowed him to produce a collection of enticing, elegant, and provocative images of the modern, sometimes decadent, affairs of those times.

Are You In Love With Your Own Writing?

“A word after a word after a word is power.” Margaret Atwood

There’s this thing called verbal narcissism. It’s pretty much the ability to game a wall, if it comes to that. To sell sand in the Sahara Desert.

It also means to be so in love with your own words that it could mean talking on and on about things that few people ever care about. Or it could happen that you do deliver a strong message, but you’re using so many words to do so, that it’s all distilled to the point of making people want to smack you over the head with their keyboards. Continue reading Are You In Love With Your Own Writing?