Book Review: The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Other Stories by Carson McCullers

From Amazon.com:

A classic work that has charmed generations of readers, this collection assembles Carson McCullers’s best stories, including her beloved novella “The Ballad of the Sad Café.” A haunting tale of a human triangle that culminates in an astonishing brawl, the novella introduces readers to Miss Amelia, a formidable southern woman whose café serves as the town’s gathering place. Among other fine works, the collection also includes “Wunderkind,” McCullers’s first published story written when she was only seventeen about a musical prodigy who suddenly realizes she will not go on to become a great pianist. Newly reset and available for the first time in a handsome trade paperback edition, The Ballad of the Sad Café is a brilliant study of love and longing from one of the South’s finest writers.

There’s something about these stories that makes you empathise with the human condition; we are who we are when we can help it, when there’s nothing else to be but ourselves.

We are who we are because someone has to be.

The characters that inhabit these little stories are what one would define as misfits, rebels. But that’s the magic of stories: we realize that we are all made of the same stuff. We are all human. We are all the same. Different, but the same. At the same time. The paradox of human nature.

What I am trying to say is that these misfits feel the same emotions as we do, and they teach us so much about ourselves, our own fights and defeats, and also make us realize that oftentimes what sets us apart must also make us feel lonely/live a life of solitude.

A must-read, The Ballad of the Sad Café contains stories about other people, stories about the kind of people that we might never encounter in real life, but those stories teach us so much about ourselves.

Advertisements

10 Reasons Why You Should Read An Young Adult Novel

The young adult genre is not only about vampires, warewolves, or some other strange creatures. Sometimes, you get to read novels like Looking for Alaska, or The Perks of Being a Wallflower. Novels that are centered around the theme of growing up, about what it truly means to be a teenager, to make friends, to try to fit in or stand out.

 

This post is sort of a two in one special, meaning that, well, you’ll see.

The Fault in Our Stars

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

So, ten reasons why you should be reading The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: Continue reading 10 Reasons Why You Should Read An Young Adult Novel

Is Facebook Essential to An Author’s Career?

Whether some people like it or not, Facebook is the world’s largest social network, which in turn means that it’s the most used app, the thing that people use more often in order to get in touch with friends and family, to discuss ideas, and to find new means of entertainment.

But what about writers? Can an author build an effective platform on Facebook? Is that important? And does having a certain number of likes amount to sales?

Well… Continue reading Is Facebook Essential to An Author’s Career?

Book Review: Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk

Palahniuk managed to amaze me with this novel. I’ve read it in a single night, as most of his other books, but this one was shockingly good, more than his usual standard. He increases the intensity of the novel with such finesse that when you reach the end, it feels as if you’ve gotten out of a roller coaster ride(no way of avoiding a terrible cliche here.) Continue reading Book Review: Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk

Facts about George Orwell

George Orwell. English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. A master of allegory, of being outspoken about issues such as social injustice, totalitarianism, and the importance of defending democratic principles.

Here are some interesting facts about the author of 1984. Continue reading Facts about George Orwell

Book Review: A Knight of Seven Kingdoms by George R.R. Martin

Taking place a hundred years before the events in the Game of Thrones, A Knight of Seven Kingdoms adds a bit more to the incredibly complex universe imagined by George R.R. Martin.

Dunk and Egg are as unlikely a duo as some of the most popular duos of the main series. Also, it is a welcome change to read about a world ruled by the Targaryens. A world at the crossroads of being changed forever. Continue reading Book Review: A Knight of Seven Kingdoms by George R.R. Martin