Book Review: The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares

I am a big fan of Latin American writers, especially G.G. Marquez and Julio Cortazar, but I have to admit to the fact that Adolfo Bioy Casares exerts a special influence on me. He lived his life under the shadow of Borges’ immense genius and was often overshadowed by the brilliant prose of a writer who can, with ease, be considered as the best writer never to have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

But Casares, even though not as famous as his best friend, and most certainly not as brilliant, managed to grow in a different direction and forge a different style. He did all that, but he managed one more thing, for which I commend him greatly. He wrote this short novel.
Continue reading Book Review: The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares

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Showcase: Vincent van Gogh

Dutch Post-Impressionist painter who created some 2100 works. Considered to be among the most influential artists of all time. He only sold one painting during his lifetime. Famous for cutting his ear off, being misunderstood and marginalized all his life to become a genius after his death. Continue reading Showcase: Vincent van Gogh

How to Become an Artist

It seems to me that we spend our childhood building our initial vision of the world. We do our best trying to answer as many questions as possible, and in our eagerness to understand everything around us, we name things and label them and we think that we’re absolutely certain that things are exactly how we see them.

And I also feel that we always return to this initial vision. Continue reading How to Become an Artist

George Orwell: Why I Write

“From a very early age, perhaps the age of five or six, I knew that when I grew up I should be a writer. Between the ages of about seventeen and twenty-four I tried to abandon this idea, but I did so with the consciousness that I was outraging my true nature and that sooner or later I should have to settle down and write books. Continue reading George Orwell: Why I Write

The Duality of Art

All art is quite useless.” – Oscar Wilde.

In a way, I agree with this statement, and I believe it to be an important element of creating and/or consuming art. We’re talking about a multi-billion dollar industry, yet art doesn’t nourish our bodies, doesn’t heal us when we’re sick (physically.) It does nothing to better the quality of our lives in any tangible way. Continue reading The Duality of Art

Showcase: M.C. Escher

Maurits Cornelis Escher was a Dutch graphic artist who made mathematically-inspired woodcuts, lithographs, and mezzotints. His work features mathematical objects and operations including impossible objects, explorations of infinity, reflection, symmetry, perspective, truncated and stellated polyhedra, hyperbolic geometry, and tessellations. Continue reading Showcase: M.C. Escher