A Writer’s Voice

When I was young and naive I was so desperate to become the writer I dreamed about that I wrote like a bunch of other people.

My words were not my own, the rules I blindly obeyed acted like a cage.

I wrote like one or two of my favorite authors, depending on the day. Sometimes I’d write with the kind of brevity only Hemingway was capable of, other times I’d struggle to craft the kind of complex sentence structure only Gabriel Garcia Marquez could manage to create.

After all, my first novel was sort-of like Great Gatsby, but from the perspective of a narrator much akin to Nick, hopelessly in love with a woman he could never have.

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Warning: This is Blocking You from Thinking Creatively

Whether you’re trying to fix a certain issue, start a business, market that business, or write an interesting article, creative thinking is crucial. The process boils down to changing your perspective and seeing things differently than you currently do.

People like to call this “thinking outside of the box,” which is the wrong way to look at it.

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Hello Rejection, My Old Friend

Whenever we submit a part of our soul that we translated into words, we do so armed with nothing but the hope that the person reading our work will understand it.

Sometimes they do. Most times they don’t.

Rejection scrapes the heart. But, well, there’s nothing to do about it. In fact, rejection is as much a part of being a writer as punching those damn keys. It’s as much a part of being a writer as edits and the rewrites and the social media marketing.

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9 Must-Read Books That Will Help You Bridge “The Creativity Gap”

I’ve always believed that what makes us want to be creative is consuming a lot of content. The more we feed our brain, the more we get this itch to create something of our own.

But there’s an issue with this. As Ira Glass so eloquently stated, we have developed taste, but we have yet to be good enough to create the type of quality content that we regularly consume.

That’s why I also believe that creatives have to feed their brains with other types of content: the content that teaches one how to be creative, how to develop the proper mindset of a content creator.

That’s why today I’m sharing with you a list of nine must-read books if you want to become a better content creator, whether you’re an artist, a writer, a blogger, or a vlogger.

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6 Books Every Writer Should Read

Photo by David Kennedy on Unsplash

Oscar Wilde once said that, “Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.”

Writing as an art can’t be taught, and even though Creative Writing courses and workshops undoubtedly help writers grow, writing is a solitary process, and it’s up to each individual to reach within the confines of his mind for answers.

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To All The Books I’ll Never Read

In my younger, more vulnerable years, I used to keep a list of all the books I read. I took pride in this, took pride in counting how many books I read in any given year.

I was one of the few who liked to read. It was a secret pleasure of mine, but as soon as I hit the thousand books milestone, it’s lost its charm to me forever.

Maybe I’ve read twice as many books so far, maybe I’m not that good at counting anymore.

In any case, there are billions of words I’ll never get to read. Millions of books, stories, poems, plays, and essays that I’ll never even know about.

I do my best to read two books a week, and if I were to…

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Is Writing Your Religion or Profession?

J.D. Salinger once wrote, “Do you know what I was smiling at? You wrote down that you were a writer by profession. It sounded to me like the loveliest euphemism I had ever heard. When was writing ever your profession? It’s never been anything but your religion. Never. I’m a little over-excited now. Since it is your religion, do you know what you will be asked when you die? But let me tell you first what you won’t be asked. You won’t be asked if you were working on a wonderful, moving piece of writing when you died. You won’t be asked if it was long or short, sad or funny, published or unpublished. You won’t be asked if you were in good or bad form while you were working on it. You won’t even be asked if it was the one piece of writing you would have been working on if you had known your time would be up when it was finished.

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