Book Review: The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Other Stories by Carson McCullers

From Amazon.com:

A classic work that has charmed generations of readers, this collection assembles Carson McCullers’s best stories, including her beloved novella “The Ballad of the Sad Café.” A haunting tale of a human triangle that culminates in an astonishing brawl, the novella introduces readers to Miss Amelia, a formidable southern woman whose café serves as the town’s gathering place. Among other fine works, the collection also includes “Wunderkind,” McCullers’s first published story written when she was only seventeen about a musical prodigy who suddenly realizes she will not go on to become a great pianist. Newly reset and available for the first time in a handsome trade paperback edition, The Ballad of the Sad Café is a brilliant study of love and longing from one of the South’s finest writers.

There’s something about these stories that makes you empathise with the human condition; we are who we are when we can help it, when there’s nothing else to be but ourselves.

We are who we are because someone has to be.

The characters that inhabit these little stories are what one would define as misfits, rebels. But that’s the magic of stories: we realize that we are all made of the same stuff. We are all human. We are all the same. Different, but the same. At the same time. The paradox of human nature.

What I am trying to say is that these misfits feel the same emotions as we do, and they teach us so much about ourselves, our own fights and defeats, and also make us realize that oftentimes what sets us apart must also make us feel lonely/live a life of solitude.

A must-read, The Ballad of the Sad Café contains stories about other people, stories about the kind of people that we might never encounter in real life, but those stories teach us so much about ourselves.

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10 Reasons Why You Should Read An Young Adult Novel

The young adult genre is not only about vampires, warewolves, or some other strange creatures. Sometimes, you get to read novels like Looking for Alaska, or The Perks of Being a Wallflower. Novels that are centered around the theme of growing up, about what it truly means to be a teenager, to make friends, to try to fit in or stand out.

 

This post is sort of a two in one special, meaning that, well, you’ll see.

The Fault in Our Stars

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

So, ten reasons why you should be reading The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: Continue reading 10 Reasons Why You Should Read An Young Adult Novel

Movie Review: Vicky Cristina Barcelona

Two girlfriends on a summer holiday in Spain become enamored with the same painter, unaware that his ex-wife, with whom he has a tempestuous relationship, is about to re-enter the picture.

Director: Woody Allen
Writer: Woody Allen
Stars: Rebecca Hall, Scarlett Johansson, Javier Bardem

About one in three movies made by Woody Allen is a masterpiece. The remaining two are terrible. Yet, that one which is a masterpiece, is loved by some, loathed by others.

What I am trying to say is that, Allen’s work is polarizing. You either adore it or hate it.

Vicki Cristina Barcelona is one of his best works. Allen weaves a bizarre story, which is kind of his trademark, but this time, he reveals an awful lot about people, which is why we enjoy stories in the first place. Continue reading Movie Review: Vicky Cristina Barcelona

Book Review: Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk

Palahniuk managed to amaze me with this novel. I’ve read it in a single night, as most of his other books, but this one was shockingly good, more than his usual standard. He increases the intensity of the novel with such finesse that when you reach the end, it feels as if you’ve gotten out of a roller coaster ride(no way of avoiding a terrible cliche here.) Continue reading Book Review: Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk

Book Review: A Knight of Seven Kingdoms by George R.R. Martin

Taking place a hundred years before the events in the Game of Thrones, A Knight of Seven Kingdoms adds a bit more to the incredibly complex universe imagined by George R.R. Martin.

Dunk and Egg are as unlikely a duo as some of the most popular duos of the main series. Also, it is a welcome change to read about a world ruled by the Targaryens. A world at the crossroads of being changed forever. Continue reading Book Review: A Knight of Seven Kingdoms by George R.R. Martin

Four Books about Rebels

Remember this commercial?

Well, the truth is that there will always be rebels. The crazy ones. The ones who are cursed with knowledge of possible futures, rather than the known hell of the present.

And literature has its fair share of rebels, of characters who don’t think outside the box, but they think like there’s no box. Outsiders, weirdos, eccentrics, all of them are allowed a bit more freedom within the confines of books than they ever were allowed in real life.

So, yeah, here are four books about rebels. For rebels. Continue reading Four Books about Rebels

These 3 Books Will Steal Your Innocence

When I first started reading at the age of fourteen, I kind of lacked a proper selective criteria when it came to books. I read what was popular, when I found a certain title appealing, what my parents kept in their bookshelf. I read certain books because everyone was reading them, because I thought it would make me smarter, a better writer, or a better person. I read books because their covers were beautiful.

And somehow I stumbled upon the kind of books that are not everyone’s cup of tea. They’re rather like a shot of whiskey. Erotic, controversial, the kind of books that you can’t read in public. But you can’t help it, so you must find a quiet place and read. Continue reading These 3 Books Will Steal Your Innocence