Showcase: Raffaele Marinetti

Raffaele Marinetti is a freelance illustrator and concept artist based in Naples (Italy), who creates digital paintings principally for private commissions but also for books, magazines covers, advertising, comic books etc. Continue reading Showcase: Raffaele Marinetti

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Book Review: The Gospel According to Jesus Christ by José Saramago

A brilliant skeptic, José Saramago envisions the life of Jesus Christ and the story of his Passion as things of this earth: A child crying, the caress of a woman half asleep, the bleat of a goat, a prayer uttered in the grayish morning light. His idea of the Holy Family reflects the real complexities of any family, and as only Saramago can, he imagines them with tinges of vision, dream, and omen. The result is a deft psychological portrait that moves between poetry and irony, spirituality and irreverence of a savior who is at once the Son of God and a young man. In this provocative, tender novel, the subject of wide critical discussion and wonder, Saramago questions the meaning of God, the foundations of the Church, and human existence itself.

 

Nobel Laureate José Saramago is a titan of literature. The quality, originality, and importance of his writings cannot be denied. yet this might be the most controversial of all his novels.

The Gospel According to Jesus Christ is the kind of novel that will make a lot of people want to throw stones at him. Maybe.

Yes, Saramago is incredibly ironic all through this story, yes, he’s incredibly sarcastic when it comes to the rules passed down by some divine power. It is the human aspect of Jesus that he describes wonderfully.

Blasphemy?

Maybe. Who knows? Continue reading Book Review: The Gospel According to Jesus Christ by José Saramago

4 Minutes of David Foster Wallace Being as Brilliant as a Man Can Be

David Foster Wallace. Writer. Teacher. A rare intellectual. But all these pale when compared to his tremendous insight into what it means to be human. The things that are so obvious we don’t even notice them.

This short video is him explaining ambition, perfectionism, and the level of dedication required to be successful in any given field. Quite remarkable.

Book Review: Make Something Up: Stories You Can’t Unread by Chuck Palahniuk

The title is self-explanatory. Chuck Palahniuk, the literary god of transgressive fiction, who kind of forgot how to write great novels somewhere in 2009 with the release of Pygmy, tries to shock the reader even more with a bunch of short stories that should act as some sort of parables somehow… I think.

Don’t get me wrong. Chuck is still one of my favorite writers. There are a bunch of brilliant novels, some fantastic short stories, and I will always be fond of passages that made me laugh out loud or truly ponder over for weeks. But… but…

That’s the word. But. Continue reading Book Review: Make Something Up: Stories You Can’t Unread by Chuck Palahniuk

TMM: Good Writers

good_writersWhen I was sixteen I thought I was a good writer. I had won a National writing competition with a magical realism novella, and the sister of a long dead, famous Romanian poet we were studying in high-school told me I wrote just like him.

This kind of gets to your head, especially at that age. This novella I had written received lots of praise from some of the best writers in the country. Published writers, award winners, people who owned publishing houses. And most of them didn’t even know I was only sixteen. Continue reading TMM: Good Writers

Book Review: The Hive by Camilo Jose Cela

Camilo Jose Cela once said, “I’m translated – what can I do about it- in every language, and I have never received an award.” Of course, he was being his usual self, witty and a bit arrogant, because he did receive awards. Virtually every single award he was entitled to: The Nobel Prize, Cervantes, Premio de Principe Asturias, and many more.

A controversial figure, especially during his later years, Cela has never been afraid to experiment with his stories. The Hive, arguably his masterpiece, introduces the reader to Spain during Franco’s regime, to a world rendered with uncanny precision. There are no heroes, no villains, nothing extraordinary happening. It’s just life, and the realism, the mundane is shockingly powerful in this novel. Continue reading Book Review: The Hive by Camilo Jose Cela