Art, Life, Love

art_life_love“It is good to love many things, for therein lies true strength, and whosoever loves much performs much, and can accomplish much, and what is done in love is well done.” – Vincent van Gogh

I see a lot of artists who just want to become artists. They believe novels simply get written, or that somehow they’ll magically get better at this. Many are reluctant to explore new possibilities or try new techniques… but that doesn’t make much sense.

I believe art to be the only reasonable way for us to venture beyond the limitations of our own world, and by doing so we reach the very essence of our humanity. We always feel close to figuring out some elusive answer to life’s most profound questions. Of course, we never do so, and that’s what keeps us going. Continue reading Art, Life, Love

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TMM: Words and Ideas

No matter what happens in my life, there’s one thing I believe in with all my heart: words can shape the world. I believe in the right words said at the right time, I believe in reading someone’s words and deciding a different outcome for yourself.
That’s one of the reasons I write. That maybe once in a while my words offer someone comfort or hope or inspire them to strive for more. I write for someone half a world away to feel less lonely in their thoughts and feelings. Continue reading TMM: Words and Ideas

Showcase: Paul Gauguin

Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin was a French post-Impressionist artist. He quit his job at a bank in order to paint. He did not manage to gain the appreciation his works deserved, even though his style was innovative in terms of the colors used and quite the departure from Impressionism.  Continue reading Showcase: Paul Gauguin

Book Review: The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Other Stories by Carson McCullers

From Amazon.com:

A classic work that has charmed generations of readers, this collection assembles Carson McCullers’s best stories, including her beloved novella “The Ballad of the Sad Café.” A haunting tale of a human triangle that culminates in an astonishing brawl, the novella introduces readers to Miss Amelia, a formidable southern woman whose café serves as the town’s gathering place. Among other fine works, the collection also includes “Wunderkind,” McCullers’s first published story written when she was only seventeen about a musical prodigy who suddenly realizes she will not go on to become a great pianist. Newly reset and available for the first time in a handsome trade paperback edition, The Ballad of the Sad Café is a brilliant study of love and longing from one of the South’s finest writers.

There’s something about these stories that makes you empathise with the human condition; we are who we are when we can help it, when there’s nothing else to be but ourselves.

We are who we are because someone has to be.

The characters that inhabit these little stories are what one would define as misfits, rebels. But that’s the magic of stories: we realize that we are all made of the same stuff. We are all human. We are all the same. Different, but the same. At the same time. The paradox of human nature.

What I am trying to say is that these misfits feel the same emotions as we do, and they teach us so much about ourselves, our own fights and defeats, and also make us realize that oftentimes what sets us apart must also make us feel lonely/live a life of solitude.

A must-read, The Ballad of the Sad Café contains stories about other people, stories about the kind of people that we might never encounter in real life, but those stories teach us so much about ourselves.

TMM: Is It Ever Enough?

Leonardo DaVinci’s last words were:

I have offended God and Mankind by doing so little with my life.

We really are our worst critics, aren’t we? We see the worst in ourselves. We stare at a mirror and all we see staring us back are flaws an faults and mistakes and so, so much to regret.

But isn’t this what keeps us going?

Showcase: Henri Matisse

Henri Émile Benoît Matisse was a French painter, often regarded, along with Pablo Picasso, as one of the artists who best helped to define the revolutionary developments in the visual arts throughout the opening decades of the twentieth century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture.

 

10 Reasons Why You Should Read An Young Adult Novel

The young adult genre is not only about vampires, warewolves, or some other strange creatures. Sometimes, you get to read novels like Looking for Alaska, or The Perks of Being a Wallflower. Novels that are centered around the theme of growing up, about what it truly means to be a teenager, to make friends, to try to fit in or stand out.

 

This post is sort of a two in one special, meaning that, well, you’ll see.

The Fault in Our Stars

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

So, ten reasons why you should be reading The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: Continue reading 10 Reasons Why You Should Read An Young Adult Novel